Education

Medical treatment for Women, Men & Children

Educational Videos for Women in Shepparton & Beyond

As your local medical professionals, one of our goals is to keep you informed on how to live a happier, healthier life. Check out these educational videos to learn more about your unique women’s health needs.

For more information please call our clinic to discuss an appointment. Ph: 03 5821 3555.

Important Information Shepparton Women's Health Centre

Chlamydia – how much do you know?

Did you know that 1 in 5 people who are younger than 30 years of age get chlamydia? Yes, Chlamydia is a common bacterial sexually transmitted infection which can happen in anyone. It can cause further infection in reproductive organs, anus, throat and occasionally in the eyes. It is commonly transmitted via vaginal, anal, or oral sex.  

Many people don’t have symptoms, making it hard to know if you’ve got it or not. Some women may notice a change in vaginal discharge, irregular bleeding, pelvic pain, burning sensation when passing urine, or bleeding and painful sex. Whereas men may experience redness at the opening of the penis, burning sensation when passing urine or discharge from the penis. If it is left untreated, Chlamydia can cause Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID) which is an infection of the uterus and fallopian tubes, which may lead to infertility. For men, it will cause pain and swelling in testicles, as well as infertility.

It is actually very easy to find out if you have it or not, via a simple urine test requested by your doctor. We call it a ‘first passed urine’, which means we collect the first part of the urine to check for it. We can also do a simple swab from the cervix, vagina or anus. It can be easily done during the consultation in the clinic.

The treatment is a single dose of 2 tablets of antibiotics which you can take instantly. However, if there are complications suspected, a longer course of treatment may be given. 
 
For More Information, Please Visit the Following Websites
 
Melbourne Sexual Health Centre 
Family Planning Victoria 
Let them know 
Drama Downunder    

This page only provides general information and you should contact your doctor (GP) for further advice if you have any concerns.

Chlamydia – how much do you know?

Chlamydia important information

Did you know that 1 in 5 people who are younger than 30 years of age get chlamydia? Yes, Chlamydia is a common bacterial sexually transmitted infection which can happen in anyone. It can cause further infection in reproductive organs, anus, throat and occasionally in the eyes. It is commonly transmitted via vaginal, anal, or oral sex.  

Many people don’t have symptoms, making it hard to know if you’ve got it or not. Some women may notice a change in vaginal discharge, irregular bleeding, pelvic pain, burning sensation when passing urine, or bleeding and painful sex. Whereas men may experience redness at the opening of the penis, burning sensation when passing urine or discharge from the penis. If it is left untreated, Chlamydia can cause Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID) which is an infection of the uterus and fallopian tubes, which may lead to infertility. For men, it will cause pain and swelling in testicles, as well as infertility.

It is actually very easy to find out if you have it or not, via a simple urine test requested by your doctor. We call it a ‘first passed urine’, which means we collect the first part of the urine to check for it. We can also do a simple swab from the cervix, vagina or anus. It can be easily done during the consultation in the clinic.

The treatment is a single dose of 2 tablets of antibiotics which you can take instantly. However, if there are complications suspected, a longer course of treatment may be given. 
 
For More Information, Please Visit the Following Websites
 
Melbourne Sexual Health Centre 
Family Planning Victoria 
Let them know 
Drama Downunder    

This page only provides general information and you should contact your doctor (GP) for further advice if you have any concerns.

Zika Virus – important information

Zika infection is increasing worldwide. Australian travellers need to be aware. Zika infection is mostly transmitted through mosquito bites. Only 1 in 5 people who acquire Zika will feel sick, often with a mild flu-like illness. Of real concern however, is Zika virus in pregnant women, as it can permanently damage the unborn child. It causes a high rate of birth deformities in babies such as a small head / brain, neurological damage, visual impairment and joint / muscular problems. 

Zika virus can be spread to pregnant women through mosquito bites but also more rarely sexually from their partner. In fact, a man who has had Zika virus can spread the virus in his semen for up to 6 months. For this reason men should use condoms for 6 months after travel to a Zika area. Protected sexual contact with a pregnant woman and avoiding conception with a woman for 6 months after travel to a Zika area is recommended. If a woman has had possible exposure through recent travel or if their partner has recently travelled it is recommended they avoid unprotected sex for 8 weeks after travel. 

Australian and International Guidelines recommend that pregnant women and those planning for pregnancy completely avoid travel to Zika areas. In fact, these guidelines recommend women avoid pregnancy for 8 weeks after travelling to Zika areas. Men should avoid falling pregnant with their partner for 6 months after leaving a Zika affected area. 

Zika virus has recently spread to many parts of the world. Historically for many years it was present in Asia and Africa. More recently there have been epidemics in the Pacific Islands and Central / South America. For a more detailed and up to date listing of affected countries please refer to the Australian Department of Health website – See this list of Zika virus affected countries.

To prevent acquisition of Zika virus while travelling, protect yourself against mosquito bites by covering up and using insect repellent. Also protect yourself against sexual transmission with safe sex. THERE IS NO VACCINE OR TREATMENT FOR ZIKA VIRUS.

Although there have been sporadic cases of Zika virus in Australia, these have all been in travellers who have brought Zika back with them. No local transmission through our mosquitoes has been documented as yet. 

If you have returned from travelling in a Zika affected area and are pregnant or concerned you may have had Zika, there are tests available which can be done to assess your risk. Please talk to your doctor about this.

Zika Virus – important information

Pregnant Women at risk Zika Virus

Zika infection is increasing worldwide. Australian travellers need to be aware. Zika infection is mostly transmitted through mosquito bites. Only 1 in 5 people who acquire Zika will feel sick, often with a mild flu-like illness. Of real concern however, is Zika virus in pregnant women, as it can permanently damage the unborn child. It causes a high rate of birth deformities in babies such as a small head / brain, neurological damage, visual impairment and joint / muscular problems. 

Zika virus can be spread to pregnant women through mosquito bites but also more rarely sexually from their partner. In fact, a man who has had Zika virus can spread the virus in his semen for up to 6 months. For this reason men should use condoms for 6 months after travel to a Zika area. Protected sexual contact with a pregnant woman and avoiding conception with a woman for 6 months after travel to a Zika area is recommended. If a woman has had possible exposure through recent travel or if their partner has recently travelled it is recommended they avoid unprotected sex for 8 weeks after travel. 

Australian and International Guidelines recommend that pregnant women and those planning for pregnancy completely avoid travel to Zika areas. In fact, these guidelines recommend women avoid pregnancy for 8 weeks after travelling to Zika areas. Men should avoid falling pregnant with their partner for 6 months after leaving a Zika affected area. 

Zika virus has recently spread to many parts of the world. Historically for many years it was present in Asia and Africa. More recently there have been epidemics in the Pacific Islands and Central / South America. For a more detailed and up to date listing of affected countries please refer to the Australian Department of Health website – See this list of Zika virus affected countries.

To prevent acquisition of Zika virus while travelling, protect yourself against mosquito bites by covering up and using insect repellent. Also protect yourself against sexual transmission with safe sex. THERE IS NO VACCINE OR TREATMENT FOR ZIKA VIRUS.

Although there have been sporadic cases of Zika virus in Australia, these have all been in travellers who have brought Zika back with them. No local transmission through our mosquitoes has been documented as yet. 

If you have returned from travelling in a Zika affected area and are pregnant or concerned you may have had Zika, there are tests available which can be done to assess your risk. Please talk to your doctor about this.

Meningococcal

The Victorian government is providing free meningococcal vaccinations for teenagers between the ages of 15 – 19 years until 31st December, 2017. This comes as a response to a sharp increase in meningococcal cases (strain W) in Australia. The 15 – 19 year old age group is being targeted as they are at increased risk of both meningococcal disease and spreading the bacteria to others. Although rare, meningococcal disease can be life threatening.

Immunisation is being offered through secondary schools (years 10, 11 and 12) but can also be obtained through your GP / Council Immuniser Provider. 

If you are not in the 15-19 age group, immunisation is available through your GP at your own cost.  

Meningococcal C vaccine is provided to all children in Australia as part of the immunisation schedule at the age of 12 months. This vaccine covers against only one strain of meningococcal disease (strain C) while the vaccine mentioned above covers 4 strains (strains ACWY) and provides additional protection.

If you need further information or would like to be vaccinated please see your GP or contact us at the Shepparton Women’s Health Centre, phone 03 5821 3555.

Meningococcal

Meningococcal important information

The Victorian government is providing free meningococcal vaccinations for teenagers between the ages of 15 – 19 years until 31st December, 2017. This comes as a response to a sharp increase in meningococcal cases (strain W) in Australia. The 15 – 19 year old age group is being targeted as they are at increased risk of both meningococcal disease and spreading the bacteria to others. Although rare, meningococcal disease can be life threatening.

Immunisation is being offered through secondary schools (years 10, 11 and 12) but can also be obtained through your GP / Council Immuniser Provider. 

If you are not in the 15-19 age group, immunisation is available through your GP at your own cost.  

Meningococcal C vaccine is provided to all children in Australia as part of the immunisation schedule at the age of 12 months. This vaccine covers against only one strain of meningococcal disease (strain C) while the vaccine mentioned above covers 4 strains (strains ACWY) and provides additional protection.

If you need further information or would like to be vaccinated please see your GP or contact us at the Shepparton Women’s Health Centre, phone 03 5821 3555.

Endometriosis

Endometriosis is a painful condition affecting 1 in 10 women, whereby the endometrial cells of the inside lining of the uterus grow outside of the uterus, causing pain. Very typically, endometriosis will induce pain in the days leading up to the period, but in more advanced stages it can cause pain throughout the cycle. It can affect fertility as well. The pain usually is in the lower abdomen, can cause problems with opening the bowels, urinating or with sexual intercourse. It can lead to women being socially isolated due to losing work and relationships and therefore it is very important to be recognised, diagnosed and treated early on. 15-20% of teenagers have severe period pain, and half of them will have endometriosis. Research has shown that it takes on average 7-10 years before a diagnosis is made and 7 visits to a primary care physician before referral to a gynaecologist occurs.

Endometriosis can be suspected based on the clinical story, occasionally seen on an ultrasound but only reliably diagnosed with a laparoscopy. Unfortunately, due to the invasiveness of the procedure this is postponed for far too long.  At the moment there is no definitive cure for endometriosis and the treatment focuses on reducing pain and improving fertility.
Show More


    At Shepparton Women’s Health Centre we are aiming to achieve the best possible outcome for women with a multidisciplinary approach with general practitioners who have knowledge in the area, gynaecologists with an interest in laparoscopic surgery, a women’s health physiotherapist and a psychologist. Treatment consists of removal of endometriosis during laparoscopy, hormonal treatment, adequate analgesia, physiotherapy, counselling and is based on a woman’s preferences, side effects, efficacy, costs and availability.

    A support group is proven to be beneficial and we have been fortunate enough to be able to attract a counsellor with personal experience in dealing with endometriosis and fertility issues, Tania MacDonald.  Tania facilitates the endometriosis support group, which is held on the last Wednesday of every second month.

    If you are interested in joining the Endometriosis Support Group or would like further information please give us a call on phone 03 5821 3555.

Endometriosis

Education

Endometriosis is a painful condition affecting 1 in 10 women, whereby the endometrial cells of the inside lining of the uterus grow outside of the uterus, causing pain. Very typically, endometriosis will induce pain in the days leading up to the period, but in more advanced stages it can cause pain throughout the cycle. It can affect fertility as well. The pain usually is in the lower abdomen, can cause problems with opening the bowels, urinating or with sexual intercourse. It can lead to women being socially isolated due to losing work and relationships and therefore it is very important to be recognised, diagnosed and treated early on. 15-20% of teenagers have severe period pain, and half of them will have endometriosis. Research has shown that it takes on average 7-10 years before a diagnosis is made and 7 visits to a primary care physician before referral to a gynaecologist occurs.

Endometriosis can be suspected based on the clinical story, occasionally seen on an ultrasound but only reliably diagnosed with a laparoscopy. Unfortunately, due to the invasiveness of the procedure this is postponed for far too long.  At the moment there is no definitive cure for endometriosis and the treatment focuses on reducing pain and improving fertility.
Show More


    At Shepparton Women’s Health Centre we are aiming to achieve the best possible outcome for women with a multidisciplinary approach with general practitioners who have knowledge in the area, gynaecologists with an interest in laparoscopic surgery, a women’s health physiotherapist and a psychologist. Treatment consists of removal of endometriosis during laparoscopy, hormonal treatment, adequate analgesia, physiotherapy, counselling and is based on a woman’s preferences, side effects, efficacy, costs and availability.

    A support group is proven to be beneficial and we have been fortunate enough to be able to attract a counsellor with personal experience in dealing with endometriosis and fertility issues, Tania MacDonald.  Tania facilitates the endometriosis support group, which is held on the last Wednesday of every second month.

    If you are interested in joining the Endometriosis Support Group or would like further information please give us a call on phone 03 5821 3555.

Our commitment to you is to provide outstanding service in all your Healthcare requirements. 

Contact us on 03 5821 3555 or email via the Contact Us button below. We’d love to hear from you.

  • Shepparton Womens Health Centre Family Friendly Clinic
  • Shepparton Womens Health Centre Family Friendly Clinic
  • Shepparton Womens Health Centre Family Friendly Clinic
  • Shepparton Womens Health Centre Family Friendly Clinic
  • Shepparton Womens Health Centre Family Friendly Clinic
  • Shepparton Womens Health Centre Family Friendly Clinic
  • Shepparton Womens Health Centre Family Friendly Clinic
  • Shepparton Womens Health Centre Family Friendly Clinic
  • Shepparton Womens Health Centre Family Friendly Clinic

We also provide telehealth services with specialists not local to the area such as endocrinologists. 

Opening Hours | Mon to Fri  9am – 5pm.

Closed weekends and public holidays.

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